EASY TO GET TO... HARD TO FORGET

 

FEATURED IN SOUTHERN LIVING, SOUTHERN LIVING

BEST WEEKEND GETAWAYS, BLUE RIDGE

COUNTRY, OUR STATE MAGAZINE, AAA HOME

AND AWAY, LOG HOME DESIGN IDEAS

MAGAZINE, AND THE MOVIE "ROAD TO

NOWHERE" FILMED IN 2009.

DAN AND BETSY WERE INTERVIEWED ON UNC TV PROGRAM "NC PEOPLE" WITH WILLIAM FRIDAY ON SEPT. 2011.

Boyd Mountain Cabins :: Vacation Rentals

445 Boyd Farm Road, Waynesville, NC 28785

828-926-1575

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A two story authentic log cabin originally from the Shelton Laurel community in Madison County North Carolina restored to a two bedroom cabin that will accommodate up to four people. The downstairs log interior has a kitchen, dining and living area with a wood burning fireplace and central heat and air conditioning. The separate bedroom has a Queen bed and bath. The loft area has two twin beds and a half bath. This cabin was originally the Boyd's guest house and overlooks the largest pond and the beautiful waterfall with a sitting area. Enjoy an outdoor firepit and wireless internet access at your cabin.

 

Shelton Laurel Cabin History

This cabin was built by the Shelton ancestors of Shelton Laurel, North Carolina. This cabin was located in a quiet cove in Madison County, NC, close to Mars Hill and 20 miles form Asheville. The cabin was built during the year of 1868, and moved to its present site on Boyd Mountain in 1975. The cabin is 18' x 20' and originally had four doors and one window. The logs are of virgin yellow poplar timber and were all hand hewn with a broad axe, and dove-tailed into a mountain cabin of a story and a half. The half is the loft. the original floors are presently used in the cabin. The cabin was originally chinked with red clay mud and the inside walls were covered with many layers of newspapers and magazines which were attached by a paste of flour and water. The foundation was laid with stacked field stones. All floor joists and rafters are presently used were hewed by hand. The roof was constructed of hand made white oak splits, today called shingles. Many a mountain man and his family have walked through these doors, so sit back and enjoy a cabin of the past.

Activities at Boyd Mountain

Boyd Mountain Gallery