EASY TO GET TO... HARD TO FORGET

 

FEATURED IN SOUTHERN LIVING, SOUTHERN LIVING

BEST WEEKEND GETAWAYS, BLUE RIDGE

COUNTRY, OUR STATE MAGAZINE, AAA HOME

AND AWAY, LOG HOME DESIGN IDEAS

MAGAZINE, AND THE MOVIE "ROAD TO

NOWHERE" FILMED IN 2009.

DAN AND BETSY WERE INTERVIEWED ON UNC TV PROGRAM "NC PEOPLE" WITH WILLIAM FRIDAY ON SEPT. 2011.

Boyd Mountain Cabins :: Vacation Rentals

445 Boyd Farm Road, Waynesville, NC 28785

828-926-1575

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A two story authentic log cabin originally from the Meadow Fork Community in Madison County, North Carolina restored in Maggie Valley to a three bedroom cabin in 1993 that will accommodate up to eight people and has central heat & air conditioning. The downstairs log interior has a kitchen, dining and living area with a fireplace. The downstairs bedroom has a Queen bed and bath. The upstairs loft area has a Queen bed and bath with a large window, and a seperate bedroom with two twin and 1 double bed and a full bath. Enjoy the view from a knoll overlooking the largest pond and fields of Christmas trees. Enjoy an outdoor firepit for your use and wireless internet access.

 

Cabin History

This cabin was built by the ancestors of Leo Rainey in the late 1790's in the beautiful Meadow Fork community of Madison County, NC. This area is North of Asheville next to Meadow Fork Creek in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The cabin was constructed of hand hewed yellow poplar trees from virgin timber. The trees were hewed with a broad axe and the ends were dove tailed. The dove tailed corners are an example of the finest workmanship. The Rainey's were approached by the Smithsonian Institute in the early 1960's to buy their log cabin homestead because of its excellent condition and because it was the oldest standing log cabin in western North Carolina. At that trime the Raineys were using the cabin as a tabacco barn and refused to sell to the Smithsonian. The cabin was originally chinked with red clay mud and the inside walls were covered with newspapers and magazines attached with paste made of flour and water. We moved the cabin to Boyd mountain in 1991 where it was restored. The 20' x 22' cabin was built as a story and a half with a loft. The original hand hewed ceiling joists are the ceiling joists now in place.

Activities at Boyd Mountain

Boyd Mountain Gallery